Category Archives: DW

DW – creative writing – How to Eat Your Tongue

We were discussing eating your words as a idiom.  Then the kids got a little silly – so did the adults – and this creative writing ensued:

Eating your tongue is a very interesting process.  It’s important that you know that once you have eaten your tongue, you can not have a tongue again.  If I ever ate my tongue, I would eat it on my dying day.  Yes, I have never eaten my tongue.  My friend did, and graciously wrote down how to do it, and now I’m going to tell you how to do it.  Eating your tongue is painful, once you have eaten it you can’t talk, taste, or anything else you tongue does.  Although you forget all of this once you taste it, nose taste.

First you take a knife and cut off your tongue, make sure you have plenty of bandages for this step.  Cut it up and use it as the meat in a favorite food dish, or cut it up and eat it plain.  Apparently both are tasty, so pick what you heart most desires.  When you are eating it, try not to think about the fact that it is your own tongue.  This dish is better than a good steak, and since you have had all that good food it adds to the flavor.  They say you are what you eat, it is totally true.  Because your tongue has the slightest flavor of everything you have eaten.

I hope wherever you decide to eat your tongue, take heed of my warnings and tips.  But it does have a good flavor.  Writing this has inspired me to eat my tongue.  I’m sure just the tip of my tongue won’t hurt, right. Oh, Oh, Oh it’s so good.  Just a little bit more. That won’t hurt. Right? Mm, M mmmm mm mmm m mmm mmmm! ( Oh, I knew it was a bad Idea!)

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Filed under 15 minute writing, DW, English Language, Students

DW’s Compare and Contrast European Paleolithic Cultures

There are many different types of hominoids. The one with the most complex life-style is Homo Sapien. Homo Sapien is divided into smaller people groups: Aurignacian, Gravettian, Solutrean, and Magdalenian. All of these people groups lived in Europe and some lived in Asia, and they  all lived when mammoths were on the Earth.  They lived during the last global maximum which was below 15 degrees celsius.

Aurignacians lived in southern Europe and Asia. They lived during a period where the Earth was entering an ice age. Aurignacians used stone, antler, and bone to make their tools. They had spears, knives, scrapers, and invented the bow and arrow. They ate fish, large game, and a variety of plants. They lived in caves. They were not nomadic. They did not bury their dead which leads us to think they did not have a religion. They had simple, artless drawings which backs up the theory that they had a religion. So, if they had religion or not, that remains a mystery.

Magdalenians lived along the western coast of Europe from what is now Portugal to Poland. They lived in a period when the Earth was coming out of the ice age, although it was still cold. They used mostly bone and antler to make their tools, though they still used stone in small amounts. They made very complex tools like harpoons and weapons made for only one type of animal, though they still are using simple tools, too. They ate: herd animals, plants, and seafood. They lived in mobile homes that they carried with them. They buried their dead, leaving the dead with food, clothes, and burial rituals. They had cave art and sculpture; all of these things lead us to know that they had religion.

Both Aurignacians and Magdalenians were Homo Sapiens. They both lived before humans were recording things. They lived in Europe and hunted big game. During very cold temperatures, both cultures expressed themselves in art. Unlike later cultures, neither farmed nor raised animals. They both lived during a period called Upper Paleolithic and were stone age peoples.

Although they are very similar, they were very different. Magdalenians buried their dead and had a religion, while Aurignacians more than likely did not have a religion. They lived in different locations in Europe. Magdalenians used mostly bone for tools and weapons and had harpoons and snares, while Aurignacians used simple tools, like the bow and arrow.

Although Magdalenian died out about 9,000 years ago we still continue the generations of Homo Sapiens. Even though Aurignacian and Magdalenian had complex tools for their time, we have even more complex tools, like computers. No matter how complex our tools get, we owe some credit to them.

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Filed under "Coming of Man", DW, English Language, European History, Geography and World Studies, Students, Writing

MMcC and DW – Taxonomy

MMcC had an assignment to look at the taxonomy of various creatures.  She and DW set to the task.  It was far tricker than they thought it would be.  Here is their result.

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Filed under Biology, DW, MMcC, Science

DW – Migration

One of the final group lessons in upper’s history lessons is a discussion of migration patterns and types.  To begin these discussions with DW, we began looking at the flow of the hominids from Africa.  DW used JV’s map from two years ago hence the submarine trenches and ranges.  She used the hole punch to color code the various hominoid groups.

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DW – Australopithecus

Australopithecus was a early hominid.  Australopithecus Africanus lived 2.66 million years ago to 1.66 million years ago.   Males were four and a half feet tall, while females were three and a half feet tall.   They lived in Africa, mostly found in Ethiopia and Tanzania.   Africa was covered in abundant rainforest and forest.  They were half-way between human and great ape, because they did not fill all of the fundamental needs of man. But they were more than just apes because they walked on two feet.

Australopithecus ate beetles, other insects, plants, fruit, small animals and fish, and roots.  They were not hunters, they were scavengers.  A small animal would have been a treat. They mostly ate plants and fish.  They did not cook their meat, and ate it raw.

Australopithecus sheltered in the woods.  They mostly tried to use shelter that was already there, rather then make one.  If they had to make a shelter they would cover themselves with leaves or shrubs.  They did not have any clothing.  Because they were living in Africa, they were warm.

Walking was the only means of transportation.  They used simple tools and weapons.  Their tools and weapons were like chimp’s tools and weapons.  Chimps use primitive tools out of grasses and sticks.

They did not have art because they were not advanced enough. Many scientists believe they did have religon. While others say they did not.  There are also two theories that they talked or had means of communication. While the others say no.

They did not have clothes, art, like we do. They did not bury dead like we do.  They might not have had a religion or communication like we do.  But we know they are more advanced than great apes because they walked on two legs.

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Filed under "Coming of Man", DW, Geography and World Studies, Letter Work, Projects, Students, Writing

Botany has its own language

DW is working on learning how flowers attach to their stems. I might argue some of her choices and one of the photos – well you’ll have to guess what the flower is.  Go out and look around at the immense level of complexity in just this one aspect of botany:

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Across the Ages

We’ve just begun the great lesson of the Coming of Man with the younger guys.  This impressionistic lesson calls the children to recognize the uniqueness of man.  It speaks about the great gifts that man brings to the whole earth.  The chart sets the stage for the next drama in the story of the unfolding of the universe.

It also calls to the child the attention to the tiny amount of time that we have written records.  The upper elementary children were much more interested in the transition in prehistoric to historic.  We wondered what the first words were – numbers, pictographic images.

 

We’ve spent some time now researching the skull development and progression as well as tool advancements.  Today we are going to put them on a timeline and see how they overlap.  Friday we’ll bring maps into the game.

 

Meanwhile there is tons of discussion about early man because JV is spending lots of time reading, writing, and working with archaeological materials.

Here are a few of his working shots:

JV washing a piece of "his" pot.

It is a lot of washing.

A piece of his pottery cleaned.

 

Other artifacts including petrified wood.

 

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Filed under "Coming of Man", BW, DW, Geography and World Studies, Geology, Going outs (Field Trips), JV, MMcC, Rock classification, Science, Students