It is project week and I’m not pulling out my hair!

Wow!  I know.  How can this miraculous event be happening?  I’m not asking any questions; I’m just going with it.

Where are our imaginary islands located?

AV’s is 500 miles off the coast of the northern most Japanese island.  He has determined that he has a volcanic island.  Most of his time has been looking for migratory bird patterns for food sources and at neolithic Japanese cultures.  He is very interested in the dogus. His island is small at 4,500 square miles.

JV’s island is in the Tasman Sea between New Zeland and Australia. His island is 12,000 square miles; it broke off of Australia but because of plate tectonics his is considered a volcanic island. He has been researching cloud forests to figure out if he can have one (yes) and where it should be located due to weather patterns.

LR’s island is 400 miles off the coast of  Nambia. He has been very focused on the land and water forms that would be found in this seamount island. It is part of a undersea mountain chain.

BR’s island is a mammoth island that is about the size of Madasgar which breaks off of eastern India as it smashes into the Asian continent.  He has done quite a bit of research to figure out his soil compositions and is very interested in the proto-“indian” language groups which would inform his island’s name.  We are currently looking at the Dravidian language groups.  He is planning on visiting a south Indian grocery store today to understand how to phonetically pronounce the words he wants.

DW is working quietly through her island which is located in the middle of  the Pacific and consists of six islands and lots of water.

This project is keeping the attention of the children highly focused.  It requires information from every area of the classroom.  It also allows for interest to vary.

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Filed under "Coming of Man", AV, BR, DW, Geography and World Studies, Geology, God With No Hands, JV, LR, Oceans and their creatures, Projects, Science, Tectonics, Volcanoes

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